Documentation of the Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak-population model by J. J. Colbert

Cover of: Documentation of the Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak-population model | J. J. Colbert

Published by Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service in Portland Or .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Douglas-fir tussock moth

Edition Notes

Book details

StatementJ.J. Colbert, W. Scott Overton, and Curtis White.
SeriesGeneral technical report PNW -- 89.
ContributionsOverton, W. Scott., White, Curtis., Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.), United States. Forest Service.
The Physical Object
Pagination85 p. :
Number of Pages85
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17613885M
OCLC/WorldCa6205864

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Additional Physical Format: Online version: Colbert, J.J. Documentation of the Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak-population model. Portland Or.: Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, U.S.

Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Reference Abstract Documentation of three model versions: the Douglas-fir tussock moth population-branch model on (1) daily temporal resolution, (2) instar temporal resolution, and (3) the Douglas-fir tussock moth stand-outbreak model; the hierarchical framework and the conceptual paradigm used are described.

Books by Language Additional Collections Journal of paediatric dentistry. Journal of materials engineering. Featured movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now. By J. Colbert, Curtis. White, W. Scott. Overton, Or.) Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland and United States.

Forest Service. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator.

Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior. Severe defoliation by the tussock moth may result in tree mortality, top-kill or weakened trees, making.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

Douglas-fir tussock moth has one generation per year. There are four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Larvae pass through four to six developmental stages, called “instars”, and adults are small moths. The flightless adult females Documentation of the Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak-population model book.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native insect in the low-lying, dry belt Douglas-fir regions of southern British Columbia. It is not an introduced species. It feeds primarily on Douglas-fir, and occasionally on ponderosa pine and western larch.

Ornamental spruce and pine may also be affected in urban. Successful management of the Douglas-fir tussock moth depends on carefully monitoring populations within high-hazard stands during the non-outbreak and building phases.

Once an outbreak begins, viable treatment options decrease significantly. Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM) population increases were first detected through traps set in cooperation with West-wide DFTM Early Warning Pheromone Detection Survey in By the USDA Forest Service Forest Entomologist in Sonora observed defoliation around Crane Flat.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Biology and Life Cycle (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth and Tussockosis (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Treatment and Control In My Backyard (PDF) Douglas-fir Tussock Moth NPV Virus Information Sheet (PDF) History of Douglas-fir Tussock Moth in South-East BC (PDF) DFTM Treatment Maps; Back to Douglas-fir Tussock Moth.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years.

Outbreaks of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), have recurred periodically, at 7- to year intervals, since the first recorded observation in in Chase, British Columbia, Canada. Anderson and May () hypothesized that microparasites are responsible for the periodic population fluctuations of some defoliating Cited by:   The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a native defoliator of Douglas-fir, true firs (such as grand fir) and spruce.

For reasons unknown, a year or two prior to an outbreak of Douglas-fir tussock moth on forested land, we tend to see defoliation of Documentation of the Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak-population model book.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Control by the Homeowner The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseuclot-sugata, is one of the most injurious insect pests of Douglas-fir and true firs found in the West.

Out-breaks may develop explosively and when they do, the caterpillars will attack less preferred species such as pine, larch, spruce, and other species. Abstract. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is a common defoliator of fir in the interior forests of western North America.

It is one of four western species of Orgyia, but it is the only member of the group that occasionally reaches outbreak numbers while feeding exclusively on conifers. 24 Because of the explosive and destructive nature of its Cited by: Orgyia pseudotsugata (Douglas-fir tussock moth) is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae found in western North America.

Its population periodically irrupts in cyclical outbreaks. The caterpillars feed on the needles of Douglas fir, true fir, and spruce in summer, and moths are on the wing from July or August to : Insecta. Douglas-fir tussock moth and its viral disease is chosen to test the hypothesis that microparasites are responsible for the periodic population fluctuations of the insect.

The test is done using Anderson and May's model and variants thereof. The parameter values for the model are derived from published data. Title. Mammoth Lakes revisited, 50 years after a Douglas-fir Tussock Moth outbreak / Related Titles. Series: Research note PNW ; By. Wickman, Boyd E. Starr, G.

Lynn. Adult Douglas-fir tussock moth male. He is a dull, brown-gray, ordinary looking moth. Table 1. Total Volume Decline l of Tree Mortality with [no treatment) Natural Degree of defoliation Estimate Class 1, Intensive Class II, Moderate Class III, Light Class IV, None OSU low1 Percent 84 84 Percent 16 19 34 Percent 0 Percent 0.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region.

Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. The production and persistence of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, has been determined by periodic sampling of a series of natural and induced have demonstrated that low prevalence rates during the early instars result mainly in larval mortality of older instars which ultimately leads to the greatest production and Cited by: Douglas-fir tussock moth caterpillars feed on needles of spruces, Douglas-fir and true firs Sporadically outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth occur in several Front Range communities.

Less commonly it occurs as a forest pest in Colorado. Numerous natural enemies attack Douglas-fir tussock moth and these will often control. Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks.

©Colorado State University Extension. 3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs.

Surviving stands are invariably in a weakened state, and very susceptible to other insects (such as the Douglas-Fir Beetle) and onally, about 20% of people and animals are allergic to Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth hairs.

These hairs are present on the larvae, the cast larval skins, the egg masses, the cocoons, and the female moth. Ground application of four insecticides on douglasfir tussock moth and western spruce budworm population in Montana (Montana. Division of Forestry. Insect and disease report) Unknown Binding – by Steve Kohler (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Author: Steve Kohler. Treatment Options for Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth About Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a defoliator of Douglas-fir, true fir (Abies spp.) and spruce (Engelmann and Colorado blue) trees.

Native to Colorado’s forests, the insect also may impact Colorado blue spruce in urban settings. Douglas-fir tussock moth or had been monitored annually for tussock moth activity as part of other research studies.

Estimation of Pupal and Larval Densities Analysis Results and Discussion Data Sets A sample plot was 50 randomly selected host trees having lower branches within reach from the ground with the trees distributed over 2 to 5 acres.

The hairs from tussock moth caterpillars break off easily and may cause skin or respiratory irritation. The preferred hosts are Douglas-fir and fir, but also include spruce, pine, and larch. The larvae feed mainly on forest trees and are infrequent pests in the landscape.

Instar development of the Douglas-fir tussock moth in relation to field temperatures / Related Titles. Series: Research note PNW ; By. Beckwith, R.

Grimble, David G. Weatherby, Julie C. Pacific Northwest Research Station (Portland, Or.) Type. Book. Tussock moth, (family Lymantriidae), any of a group of moths (order Lepidoptera), the common name for which is derived from the hair tufts, or tussocks, found on most larval family, which occurs in both Eurasia and the New World, includes several species that are destructive to shade and forest trees: the gypsy moth (q.v.; Lymantria dispar), browntail moth (Nygmia.

Examples of this role can be found in the Mountain Pine Beetle and Douglas-fir Tussock Moth exten- sions of the Stand Prognosis Model (Crookston et al., ; Monserud and Crookston, ).

Computing constraints forced Monserud and Crookston () to aggregate the tree list into a smaller set of tree classes that became the substrate for the Cited by: Many tussock moth caterpillars have urticating hairs (often hidden among longer, softer hairs), which can cause painful reactions if they come into contact with skin.

The subfamily Lymantriinae includes about known genera and over 2, known Class: Insecta. Outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth are cyclical, typically occurring every 7 to 14 years.

On average, outbreaks last 2 to 4 years. The last outbreak began in (Figure 1); therefore, we are due for another. Lifecycle of the Douglas-fir tussock moth.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth spends the winter months in the egg stage. Significant impacts by the Tussock Moth have been reported on Cheyenne Mtn by Colorado Springs, Near Perry Park, the Rampart Range, and northwest of Boulder.

This is not to be confused with the western spruce budworm, although both are defoliators of spruce, Douglas fir and white fir.

For more information, see the CSU Extension Sheet on Tussock. Includes. Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) Rusty tussock moth (Orgyia antiqua nova) Pest description and crop damage Caterpillars with tufts (tussocks) of hair.

Larvae may be found in large numbers under webbing on branches. Tussock Moths (Orgyidae, or Lymantriidae), a family of insects of the order Lepidoptera. The wingspan is usually mm. The moths have rudimentary mouth organs. (Most of them do not feed.) The caterpillars are polyphagous and have a thick, hairy covering.

They feed on leaves, primarily of trees. The pupae have hairy bundles on their backs. Pupation. NEXT BOOK; VIEW ALL BOOKS ALL BOOKS; Chemical and Biological Controls in Forestry. Editor(s): Willa Y. Garner 1; John Harvey 2; Volume.

Douglas-fir tussock moth: sex pheromone identification and synthesis. Smith RG, Daterman GE, Daves GD Jr. The sex pheromone of the Douglass-fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough) has been isolated and identified as (Z) by:   Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia by Torgersen, Torolf R.

cn; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.); United Service. cn. Douglas-fir tussock moth control by the homeowner (Oregon State University.

Extension Service. FS) [Joseph Capizzi] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Joseph Capizzi.STEREOSELECTIVE SYNTHESIS OF THE SEX PHEROMONES OF THE DOUGLAS FIR TUSSOCK MOTH, T. Chemischer Informationsdienst16 (28) DOI: /chin Carbon-Carbon Bond-Forming Reactions of Compounds of Boron, Silicon, and by: The development and operational use of a management system for control of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), populations at pre-outbreak levels, p.

In M. L. McMannus, and A. M. Liehhold (ed.), Population dynamics, impacts, and integrated management of forest defoliating insects. USDA Forest Cited by: 6.

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